Dyslexia
OPENING DOORS - Reading Tutoring
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Research Supporting Orton-Gillingham Approach
Early Intervention Research
How A Parent Can Build Self-Esteem
Introducing a New Blog

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Alternative ways to view Dyslexia
Dyslexia
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Dyslexia

Research Supporting Orton-Gillingham Approach

Research supporting the Orton-Gillingham approach
 
Research shows that 95% of reading failure is preventable — by using appropriate reading systems and well-trained teachers.
Dr. Orton and Anna Gillingham developed aunique method and sequenceto significantly improve the reading and spelling skills of children and adults with dyslexia way back in the 1930's.
All the latest scientific, independent, replicated reading research supports the Orton-Gillingham sequence and methodology as “best practices” when teaching reading to students with dyslexia.

Early Intervention Research

A Summary of the Research

Research on the long-term consequences of early reading difficulty provides an incentive for early intervention. Juel (1988) found that students who are poor readers in first grade are almost certain to remain poor readers at the end of fourth grade. Cunningham and Stanovich (1997) found that first-grade reading achievement strongly predicts 11th-grade reading achievement.

How A Parent Can Build Self-Esteem

The article was written by Fellissa Richard, a parent whose child wasn't diagnosed with dyslexia until he was 13. Despite special education support, her child felt stupid and wanted to give up.
Here's what she did:

  1. Talked to her child about dyslexia:She let him know that manysuccessful peoplehave learned to manage its challenges. She discussed dyslexia frankly yet positively, and let him know how common this condition is. It affects 1 out of 5 people.
  2. Focused on how smart her son is:Every chance she had, she let her son know how smart he was.

Introducing a New Blog

Introducing a New Blog
 
I am pleased to announce the introduction of the Dyslexia Advantage.  This is an alternative way to view Dyslexia and focus on how it can be used to achieve rather than to simply endure.
 
This blog will be about resetting expectations and raising the bar.
 
"It needs to be understood that dyslexia is a "learning difference"; just as we all look different, we think and learn differently, too."
-- Stacey Poulos